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Intimations of Cosmotheism: Wagner and Shaw — A Synthesis

oswald-mosley-300x399by Sir Oswald Mosley (pictured)

EDITOR’S NOTE: This piece is the first in a series of articles which will illustrate some of the earlier intimations, in the works of other writers and thinkers, of the central ideas of Dr. William Pierce’s philosophy, Cosmotheism. Even the reader who is not a devotee of Wagner, or familiar with Bernard Shaw’s interpretation of his Ring cycle, should bear with Mosley’s essay: it will prove illuminating and inspiring. — Kevin Alfred Strom.

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THE MAN OF ACTION in the realm of art is a helpless being. If he has even the beginning of the sensitivity which is as essential to great action as it is to great art, he is irresistibly drawn to the luminous world, but within it he is an ingenuous, defenceless and, indeed, pathetic intruder. Yet his position has at least the compensation that he is not expected to talk sense, and certainly not to defend his strange and uninformed opinions intelligibly and effectively. He has the chartered license of the innocent as surely as the artist has in politics.

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Intimations of Cosmotheism: Aviation, the Cosmos, and the Future of Man

Charles Lindbergh-2

by Charles A. Lindbergh (pictured)

EDITOR’S NOTE: This piece is the second in a series of articles which will illustrate some of the earlier intimations, in the works of other writers and thinkers, of the central ideas of Dr. William Pierce’s philosophy, Cosmotheism.

Here the great aviator, scientist, and patriot Charles Lindbergh speaks of the advancement of man on the eve of our race’s first steps on another world in 1969; he hints at a higher type of man whose dawn may be seen if we can “contrive a new process of evolutionary selection,” and speaks of an awareness that our lives — and even Life itself — may only be way stations on a journey of increasing consciousness, the next stage of which even our best minds cannot yet imagine. — Kevin Alfred Strom.

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AVIATION AND ASTRONAUTICS were once my prime interests. As a student pilot, at the age of 20, when aviation was much more dangerous than it is today, I concluded that if I could fly for ten years before being killed in a crash, I would be willing to trade an ordinary lifetime for that experience. In the ’30s, I assisted Robert Goddard, the father of spatial conquests. Standing with him on New Mexico plains at the foot of his converted-windmill launching tower, it seemed to me that the greatest adventure man could have would be to travel out through space.

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Cosmotheism in Savitri Devi

1925-with-two-Greek-friends-600-dpi-color-CROPPED-RETOUCHEDEDITOR’S NOTE: R. G. Fowler published the following extracts from Savitri Devi’s Defiance under the title “The Superman: The Purpose of the Universe, the Meaning of Life.” I am reprinting it here because of the resemblance to William Pierce’s philosophy of Cosmotheism.

Defiance, Centennial Edition, p. 61:

“MY FIRM conviction. . . is that the highest purpose of life is to forward the growth of a superior humanity, whose role is to rule a healthy world. No means are too ruthless that can bring us nearer to that goal.” (ILLUSTRATION: Savitri Devi in 1925)

Defiance, Centennial Edition, p. 234:

“The divinely ordained differences, expression of the impersonal will of the Sun, can only be maintained, nay, increased, according to the highest purpose of Creation which is to evolve perfect types, if each race is maintained pure,” said I. “And that is why, knowingly or unknowingly echoing the wisdom of ages, a great German of today, a close collaborator of the Führer has written: ‘Only in pure blood does God abide’.”

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Sentience of the Universe

by David Sims

THE QUESTION was asked: “Is there a belief that revolves around the idea that life will continue to evolve until the entire universe is a sentient being?”

Yes. It’s called Cosmotheism, whose most famous proponent, as far as I know, was Dr. William L. Pierce, who is chiefly known for his racial and political views.

But the idea isn’t that living things will get bigger and bigger. Rather, the Cosmotheist principle is that matter forms into more complex systems as time goes by, and, with regard to living things, that implies a progression:

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The Need for a New Religion

cloudscape

by Max Musson

WE LIVE IN a world in which many people have a dark sense of foreboding. Particularly in Western European countries where we have experienced better times within living memory, there is a feeling that many facets of our lives are deteriorating and have been relentlessly deteriorating for several decades at least.

In material terms we appear to be better off than ever before and yet the material benefits themselves do not seem to adequately compensate for less welcome changes and the sense that somehow our civilisation is in decay. Also the greater awareness of environmental and demographic factors means that we are conscious of the fact that we in the West are ‘living beyond our means’ and beyond the means of our planet to sustain indefinitely. We are told that mankind is already consuming natural resources at a rate faster than our planet can renew them and therefore there exists a sense of guilt in one’s enjoyment of our apparently greater material wealth.

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God — A Work in Progress

Earth

by Max Musson

MOST PEOPLE fall into the trap of believing that there is either;

1. A fully formed, often anthropomorphised, conscious, sentient, all knowing, all powerful, all loving God, who has a particular interest in, and cares for us; or

2. There is no God.

Dawkins is good at demolishing belief in the first of these possibilities and the mistake that most people make as a consequence is to believe that his arguments therefore prove that the second possibility is therefore correct.

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